DR. ELAINE RUIZ LÓPEZ - CEO NEWS & NOTES JAN 2020

January 27, 2020

“One Year goes by taking with it a set of hopes and aspirations. Another Year comes in with bundles of new opportunities to relive your dreams and realize your goals.”

2020 Chinese New Year
 
The Chinese people usually spend the first day of the Chinese New Year with their family members at home. They usually have dumplings or niangao as the first meal of the New Year. After breakfast, little kids put on new clothes and give New Year greetings to their parents and grandparents. Both the kids and un-married adults may receive monetary red envelopes from seniors in the family. Some people will go to temples in hope of having good luck the whole year. At our charter school the knowledge of the Chinese culture, customs and tradition is valued and respected. The Chinese Mandarin curriculum is an integral part of our program of study. Our Mandarin teachers work with our scholars in their sophomore and junior years, in order to broaden their understanding of this very significant language that has a 5000 year history and has become the number 1 language in the Global Economy. The contributions that the Chinese people have made throughout history, intricacies reflected in the arts, culture, science and education, are just some examples of what we have learned to value about China and the Chinese people. During our trip to Bejing- China in the April of 2019 we participated in lessons on calligraphy and paper cutting. Here we highlight the Chinese Paper-Cut, its history and beauty.

Photo of Dr. Elaine Lopez in ChinaPhoto of Dr. Elaine Lopez in China

 
2019 May photos of CEO Dr. Elaine Lopez trip to ChinaThe Chinese Paper-Cut

Paper-cut is a very distinctive visual art of Chinese handicrafts. It originated from the 6th century when women used to paste golden and silver foil cuttings onto their hair at the temples, and men used them in sacred rituals. Later, they were used during festivals to decorate gates and windows. After hundreds of years’ development, now they have become a very popular means of decoration among women.

The main cutting tools are simple: paper and scissors or an engraving knife, but clever and deft craftspeople are remarkably good at cutting in the theme of daily life. When you look at items made in this method carefully, you will be amazed by the true to life expressions of the figure’s sentiment and appearance, or portrayal of natural plants and animals’ diverse gestures. Patterns of chrysanthemum display the curling petals, pied magpies show their tiny feathers and others such as a married daughter returning to her parents’ home, or young people paying a Chinese New Year call to their grandparents.

https://www.travelchinaguide.com/intro/arts/paper_cut.htm
https://www.travelchinaguide.com/essential/holidays/new-year/customs.htm

From late January to mid-February, Korea, China, Viet Nam, and other Asian countries celebrate Lunar New Year. It is called this because the occasion is based on the Lunisolar calendar. In Korean, the Lunar Solar celebration is a called Seollal. The Korean Lunar New Year Celebration last 3 Days. The Solar Calendar is a measure of the earth rotation around the sun. The solar calendar is a measure of the earth’s rotation around the sun. A year on the solar calendar has 365 days. The lunar calendar is a measure of the moon’s rotation around the earth. A year on the lunar calendar has 354 days. Asian New Year celebrations often have dragon dances.

2020-korean-new-year.
Read More KTKD https://ktkd.nyc/about-us/

2020-korean-new-year.

차례Ancestral Rite
The morning of 설날 begins with an ancestral rite, called 차례. A great deal of food is prepared and set in specific places on the table. Once set, family members gather in front of the ritual table and the ceremony begins with deep bows as greetings to the ancestor spirits. The purpose of this ritual is to express gratitude to ancestors and pay for the family’s well-being throughout the year.
At our charter school we have taught Tae Kwon Do for the past 10 years led by Master Regina, founder and Director of Korea Tae Kwon Do in the photo above. As part of an annual Lunar Year tradition, our Seniors are taught the values of Korean Culture and how to give the “Big Bow” to the elders as a symbol of respect. This is followed by sweet treats in keeping with the Korean Lunar New Year celebration.

세배 (sebae): The New Year’s Bow
세배 is the deep traditional bow of respect to one’s elders. It consists of deep bows, in which a person kneels to the floor and extends his or her arms outward. Men place their left hand over their right hand, but women put their right hand over their left hand.

2020 ILCHS alumni2020 ILCHS alumni
Alumni Speak to Class of 2020
International Leadership Charter High School Class of 2019 Alumni on winter break, visit the Class of 2020 to speak about their transition to college, tips to finish their senior year strong and how to adequately prepare for life beyond high school. Alumni shown in photos include Adriana Cameli our Director of College Prep: Class of 2019 Valedictorian Toni-Ann Royes: News York University, Grace Morel: Stony Brook University, & Arianna Manobanda: SUNY Albany. We are very proud of what our alumni have been able to accomplish.

At ILCHS, we seek to prepare every student to become a leader in the global world, and we are truly proud of our success! To build on and maintain this success, however, we need your support. Please consider supporting ILCHS today!

As ILCHS is a qualified 501(c)(3) organization, your contribution will be fully tax deductible.

Please visit our donations page to make a safe and secure online contribution.

Posted: January 28, 2020